Tag Archive | Wednesday’s Word

Reflection on a whole year of blogging

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It has now been a whole year since I began blogging.  In fact just over a year. Where has that year gone?  Time certainly flies as you get older! Continue reading

Wednesday’s Word – Bugbear

Bugbear

Noun: (buhg-bair)

  • any source, real or imaginary, of needless fright or fear.
  • a persistent problem or source of annoyance.
  • Folklore – a goblin that eats up naughty children.

Origin:

C16: from bug + bear

1580s, a sort of demon in the form of a bear that eats small children, also“object of dread” (whether real or not), from obsolete bug “goblin,scarecrow”

Example:

What had once been a bugbear was now a bullish sign of growth.

My Thoughts:

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Wednesday’s Word – Rident

Rident

Adjective: (rahyd-nt)

  • laughing; smiling; cheerful.

Origin:

C17: from Latin rīdēre to laugh; see riant

Example:

“Mamma was gracious and happy. Hetty was radiant and rident.” William Makepeace Thackeray; The Virginians; 1859.

My Thoughts:

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Wednesday’s Word – Thaumaturge

Thaumaturge

Noun: (Thaw-muh-turj)

  • a worker of wonders or miracles; magician

Origin:

Thaumaturge is a back formation from the adjective thaumaturgic. It stemsfrom the Greek words thaumatos meaning “wonder, wondrous thing” and ergon meaning “work.” Thaumaturge entered English in the early 1700s.

My Thoughts:

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Wednesday’s Word – Frigorific

Frigorific

adjective: (frig-uh-rif-ik)

  • causing or producing cold

Example:

When the fog reached the spot where the observer stood, it was found to be devoid of smell, but its influence was decidedly frigorific.  R. Angus Smith, “A Curious Fog” Popular Science Monthly, August 1875

Origin:

Frigorific is derived from the Latin word frigus meaning “cold” with the last element -fic coming from the verb facere, “make, do.”  It entered English in the mid 1600s.

My Thoughts:

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Wednesday’s Word – Sternutation

Sneezing

Sternutation

noun: (stur-nyuh-tey-shuh n)

  • The act of sneezing

Example:

It was a high-pitched sneeze, a most delicate sternutation, the merest zephyr tangled in a pretty powdered, finger-tip of a nose. Eric Linklater, Magnus Merriman, 1934

Origin:

Sternutation derives from the Latin verb sternuere meaning “to sneeze”.  It entered English in the mid 1500s

My thoughts:

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